Stilts House Resort

Royal University of Fine Arts
Faculty of Architecture and Urbanism
Class: Year 3D
Professor: Orn Sithorn, Lim Engngoun
Student: Yeng Sereyroth 
 
A community between human and nature
 
Tonle Sap Lake brings a sense of timelessness, a feeling that is near to be nothing. On the great lake people have always lived as community with their surroundings and with its offering. The lake is home to nearly a quarter of Cambodia’s population who live in or around the waterway. In addition to sustaining a large human population, more than 200 species of fish and a variety of animal species include many exotic birds benefit from the lake. Moreover Tonle Sap provides numerous opportunities for tourists to visit the stilted villages and experience diverse animals that inhabit in the lake.Adapted to the ebb of the lake many houses were built on stilts. People of stilted villages need materials to build their houses and make fishing gears. Those materials are available in their surround environment. Some tree species are not only useful for building houses but also they are used as source of food and traditional medicine. Bamboo is the most commonly used for houses and reeds are seen in lighter structures. The house dwellings were covered by thatch roof.In raining season the waters of Tonle Sap rises which cause flooding the entire village. The stilted houses allow the villagers to stay at the same place when the lake rises upwards of 30 feet. When the water rises villagers move their houses up until successive levels of the stilts in order to stay above the high of water. People travel by boats to get around such as going to market, restaurants, churches, and wedding platforms.My project is a new design platform, adapted the methodology of stilted houses on Tonle Sap, for the flooding area in Phnom Penh.
Concept

@Yeng Sereyroth

 

@Yeng Sereyroth

@Yeng Sereyroth

@Yeng Sereyroth

@Yeng Sereyroth

 
 

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